1. Cities have often been compared to language: you can read a city, it’s said, as you read a book. But the metaphor can be inverted. The journeys we make during the reading of a book trace out, in some way, the private spaces we inhabit. There are texts that will always be our dead-end streets; fragments that will be bridges; words that will be like the scaffolding that protects fragile constructions. T.S. Eliot: a plant growing in the debris of a ruined building; Salvador Novo: a tree-lined street transformed into an expressway; Tomas Segovia: a boulevard, a breath of air; Roberto Bolano: a rooftop terrace; Isabel Allende: a (magically real) shopping mall; Gilles Deleuze: a summit; and Jacques Derrida: a pothole. Robert Walser: a chink in the wall, for looking through to the other side; Charles Baudelaire: a waiting room; Hannah Arendt: a tower, an Archimedean point; Martin Heidegger: a cul-de-sac; Walter Benjamin: a one-way street walked down against the flow.

    — Valeria Luiselli, “Relingos: The Cartography of Empty Spaces” (via invisiblestories)

  2. theantidote:

    LITERATURE MEME | 1/2 MOVEMENTS

    "The mind in creation is as a fading coal, which some invisible influence, like an inconstant wind, awakens to transitory brightness; this power arises from within, like the colour of a flower which fades and changes as it is developed, and the conscious portions of our nature are unprophetic either of its approach or its departure." 

    Percy Bysshe Shelley, A Defence of Poetry.

    Romanticism was an attitude or intellectual orientation that characterised many works of literature, painting, music, architecture, criticism, and historiography in Western civilisation over a period from the late 18th to the mid-19th century. Romanticism can be seen as a rejection of the precepts of order, calm, harmony, balance, idealisation, and rationality that typified Classicism in general and late 18th-century Neoclassicism in particular. It was also to some extent a reaction against the Enlightenment and against 18th-century rationalism and physical materialism in general. Romanticism emphasised the individual, the subjective, the irrational, the imaginative, the personal, the spontaneous, the emotional, the visionary, and the transcendental.

    (Source: mercurien)

  3. casabet64:

Valentina Franco

    casabet64:

    Valentina Franco

  4. iznogoodgood:

Nastassja Kinski

    iznogoodgood:

    Nastassja Kinski

    (Source: smokingissexy)

  5. semioticapocalypse:

Tetsuro Sato
[::SemAp FB || SemAp::]

    semioticapocalypse:

    Tetsuro Sato

    [::SemAp FB || SemAp::]

  6. firsttimeuser:

    © Marilyn Bridges

    • Concorde
    • Killer Whale
    • Pathway Into Infinity
    • Feathers
    • Birdman

    via

  7. marinaabramopug:

    The public throng to see her live.

  8. (Source: shotsofhappy)

  9. (Source: ricktimus)

  10. elettrogenica:

    hans killian: facies dolorosa

    : bizzarrobazar.com

  11. fotojournalismus:

    Festival of the Good Death Celebrated in Cachoeira, Brazil

    The Afro-Brazilian Sisterhood of the Good Death is made up of female descendants of slaves, all age 50 and over, and honours both Catholic traditions and Afro-Brazilian Candomble religious rites. The sisterhood is believed to be the oldest organization for women of African descent in the Americas. The state of Bahia received at least 1.2 million slaves from Africa and remains the most African of Brazilian states, where blacks make up around 80 percent of the population.

    Photos by Mario Tama/Getty Images — August 14-17, 2014.

  12. silentmemos:

Marta Bevacqua

    silentmemos:

    Marta Bevacqua

  13. shihlun:

Jane Evelyn Atwood, Blind children Learning What a cat feels like, 1981.

    shihlun:

    Jane Evelyn Atwood, Blind children Learning What a cat feels like, 1981.

  14. luzfosca:

W. Eugene Smith
Untitled, 1954
Thanks to undr

    luzfosca:

    W. Eugene Smith

    Untitled, 1954

    Thanks to undr